A Dictionary of Colour — Gold RSS



BRITISH COLOUR STANDARD - Golden Buff No. 221

A descriptive colour name introduce into seasonal ranges in 1945. A very old colour name derived from Buffalo, through the Italian Buffalo. From Greek, boubalos (the old world ox). Many varieties of Buffs are used in different industries, very often with adjectives as dark, light, deep, rich, tan etc. Originally referring to the colour of the leather used in soldiers’ uniforms. There are references to Buff as forming part of the facings on uniforms of the Trained Bands of London as long ago as 1572, and it has been stated that the East Kent Regiment derives its name “the Buffs” from the fact that they were the first regiment to use accoutrements of buffalo leather. The facings used on the uniform...

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BRITISH COLOUR STANDARD - Gold No.72

A color standardised in 1934 see also Adam gold and white gold. There is considerable confusion with regard to this colour, and a great many variations have been featured under this name. It is probably owing to its being a metal that we see so many variations, inasmuch as the slightest change in the angle at which a piece of gold is seen will give a different colour sensation. Moreover, the association of the two words Gold and Yellow is so close that the average mind instinctively connects the two. A piece of gold having no reflected light would be near to Old Gold. B.C.S No. 115, but if illuminated it would become the colour here given.  

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